Installation of Plant Boxes and benches on the Peoria Street Exit of the UIC-Halsted Blue Line Stop

Project Timeline- The project can be done within 1-2 weeks when started, but should wait to be implemented until after the winter season in Chicago, as the plants will likely not survive the harsh winters that Chicago endures. Planter boxes will also have to be ordered, which must be added to the timeline. Once the boxes and warm weather arrive, the soil and plants can be added.

Project Description- This project will attempt to add a more pleasant view when students, faculty, and all people use the Peoria St. exit of the UIC-Halsted Blue Line stop. The goal is put in 10 6x2x2 ft. boxes and 8 6x2x2 benches along the sides of the walkway that lead out of the station. While the bridge is not used by cars, emergency vehicles do use the walkway during emergency events. However, the average width of an emergency vehicle is 8 ft. (1), which would leave plenty of space for the vehicles. The boxes would be filled with beautiful flowers that would add a more colorful and healthy backdrop to people as soon as they enter our beautiful campus. The benches would allow for a meeting and gathering place for people to meet before heading onto our campus or off into our beautiful city. This project could also involve city services, such as the Botanic Gardens, with the participation of elementary school students in planting the planters. This project could be a unifier, and help educated children in the care of green space. This could be a possible Earth Day project.

Preliminary Project Budget-

(2) 10 Planters-~$5,000

8 Benches-~$3,000

Dirt-~$400

Plants-~$1,000

Landscapers and equipment*-~$4,000

Total Cost-~$13,400

*Possible to include education programs and volunteers to help with some of the project.

 

 

References

(1)(Emergency Vehicle Access) http://fama.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/1441593313_55ecf7e17d32d.pdf

(2) Planter and Bench supplier) http://ornamentalstone.com/planters.htm

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One thought on “Installation of Plant Boxes and benches on the Peoria Street Exit of the UIC-Halsted Blue Line Stop

  1. This idea is great! Particularly in the hot summer months, it seems to me, that space is rather hot, barren, and yes an area of transit, it is still wasted. I believe your project hints at some larger concepts and projects that have sprung up in urban spaces in recent decades. Though this project will provide a greening, and thus cooling effect to this space, it hints to some mega projects that you may want to read about. The Rose Kennedy Greenway in Boston is a linear park that is the product of sinking the expressway below ground, and thus establishing open, public, green space. Plants tend to diffuse noise, so think of that positive externality when conceptualizing your project. Perhaps you could create walls of vines to grow on the fences that shelter some noise, or at least make the highway invisible, which would make this pedestrian bridge more attractive. Even consider, though I’m sure expensive, the possibility of creating some kind of permeable coverage that a vining plant could canopy the area.
    Smaller ways of conceptualizing what can be done to soften concrete space might lead you to think of the Highline in New York City or Chicago’s 606. These spaces were once just as barren and unavailable for human recreation. Perhaps this project could spur idea for the covering of Chicago’s highways and the creation of linear parks throughout the city? A pilot project such as this one could certainly lead to some profound inspiration as to how highways and bare concrete effect noise pollution in cities, not to mention the amazing amount of heat they capture in summer months.

    Some things to read on that could send you in a wide-scope direction or provide some inspiration:
    http://www.rosekennedygreenway.org/about-us/greenway-history/

    https://www.epa.gov/heat-islands

    http://www.governing.com/columns/urban-notebook/dallas-covers-highway-greenery.html

    Like

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