Healthy Foods in Low income Communities

It all started between the 1960s and 1970s when the white, middle-class families moved to the suburbs and the small food businesses.  That’s when it made it difficult to the low-income urban communities to maintain a healthy diet.  The only chose people were able to come up with was to purchase was unhealthy foods for their family.  To help the communities we will need a man named Will Allen, he has his own business that’s called Grow Power Community.  It’s a business where he grows different fruits and vegetables in a low-income area.  He talks about how some low-income neighborhood shouldn’t only processed foods. He believes everyone, regardless of their economic status should have the access to safe and healthy foods.  Will Allen is open for his business, I say that because he doesn’t have a gate around his garden.  He believes that families should be able the connect with the foods.

Being in high poverty communities that can come with job loss and physical and economic decline.  Having more healthy shops for the community can give families jobs and a healthier selection to eat.  Also having more farmers markets in the neighborhood can give families have a bigger perspective on healthy eating.  While doing some research I’ve noticed the food Markets are in only well-known places.  We have food markets in Chicago, but we should look into communities that really need the healthy foods.

Websites:

http://www.nhi.org/online/issues/147/healthyfoods.html

farmers-market

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One thought on “Healthy Foods in Low income Communities

  1. I agree with you. These under-served communities need better access to healthy food options. I also think that the way to do this is to focus on expanding and creating more neighborhood farmer’s markets. However, I do believe you should consider looking at large-scale healthy food stores, like Whole Foods, because it may be difficult for smaller markets to produce, especially in the winter.

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